Red Giant PluralEyes

Exporting to Adobe Premiere Pro

 

In PluralEyes 4, you can export a synchronized timeline as an XML file that can be imported into Adobe Premiere Pro. To access this feature, click the Export Timeline tab, then choose Premiere Pro from the Export Format drop-down menu.

 

What is XML?

 

The XML file is a small text file that references your media files, and indicates the order and spacing of the media files relative to each other. When you import the XML file, Premiere Pro creates a new sequence in which the audio and video clips are synchronized.

 

TIP: You always have the option of exporting the timeline as video/audio files, rather than exporting an XML file. To learn about this, see Export Timeline> Media Files.

 

Exporting to Premiere Pro

 

Here are the steps:

 

  1. (Optional) Save your project with a meaningful name. This will make it easier to locate and manage your exported files later.
  2. Click the Export Timeline tab in the toolbar, OR choose File> Export Timeline from the top pull-down menu.
  3. Select Premiere Pro from the Export Format drop-down selector.
  4. Select the Create sequence with replaced audio checkbox, if you want an additional sequence where the video clips have the original camera audio replaced with the corresponding (synced) external audio.
  5. Click Export.
  6. In the Exports window, you will see a row titled <project name>_FCP_Premiere.xml.
  7. Do one of the following:
    • From the Exports window, click and drag the exported XML directly into the Project Panel in Premiere Pro. OR
    • In Premiere Pro, choose File> Import, and browse for the file that you just created in the ~Documents/PluralEyes/Exports folder.
  8. When you import into Premiere Pro, one or more sequences are added to the active project.

 

Export Premiere Pro

 

OPTION: Create sequence with replaced audio

 

With this option, the audio content that was recorded in your original video clips is replaced in the synced timeline. Now no further effort is required to keep these clips in sync during the editing process. This is useful if you have one or more audio-only tracks containing your “good” audio, and you no longer need the “bad” audio from the original video clips.

 

In the Premiere Pro project created by PluralEyes, there are two sequences:

 

  • A sequence whose name ends with “replaced.” This includes new audio clips trimmed to match the length of corresponding video clips.
  • A sequence whose name ends with “synced.” This includes all of your original audio content, in case you want to use audio content that was recorded on your video cameras.

 

Things to know about this option:

 

  • None of the audio content from the original video clips is included.
  • If there are two or more audio-only tracks in your PluralEyes project, only the uppermost audio clip that overlaps with a given video clip is included.
  • Selecting this option does not require additional disk space. The original media files are not modified in any way, and no additional media files are generated.

 

 

Viewing the project in Premiere Pro 7.2.2 and older

 

Note: Starting with Premiere Pro CC 2014, the file duplications described below do not occur, so if you are using CC 2014 you can skip this section.

 

When the PluralEyes timeline opens in your Premiere Pro project, you will see a duplication of the files. This creates some visual clutter, but it does not affect the project, project size, or exported sync. Unfortunately, it is a limitation of importing XML files into Premiere Pro.

 

It is important to understand that your media has NOT been duplicated. Only the reference information inside Premiere Pro has been duplicated. The project doesn’t use additional disk space as it's only adding a few KB of information per project file. If you use the Reveal in Finder command, all references point to the same source files on your computer.

 

In Premiere’s Project Window, the duplicate references display in a folder titled “_synced”. The reference files INSIDE the folder are what's come in from PluralEyes, and they are synced. The reference files OUTSIDE the folder are what was in Premiere Pro originally, and they are unsynced.

 

Your simple workaround is to work with the files that are inside the "_synced" project folder.

 

 

Viewing the project in Premiere Pro CC 2015 and newer

Note: Starting with Premiere Pro CC 2015, audio files are duplicated when you start a project in Premiere Pro. This creates some visual clutter, but it does not affect the project, project size, or exported sync. Unfortunately, it is a limitation of importing XML files into Premiere Pro.

It is important to understand that your media has NOT been duplicated. Only the reference information inside Premiere Pro has been duplicated. The project doesn’t use additional disk space as it's only adding a few KB of information per project file. If you use the Reveal in Finder command, all references point to the same source files on your computer.

In Premiere’s Project Window, the duplicate references display next to the synced sequence. 


To work around the problem, you can either start a project in PluralEyes or export the Premiere Pro project to an XML file and use the manual XML workflow. See steps below:

  1. In Premiere Pro, click an empty area in the project panel so nothing is selected.
  2. Click the menu item File > Export > Final Cut Pro XML... and save the project to an XML file.
  3. Launch PluralEyes, drag and drop the above XML file onto PluralEyes, sync then export to Premiere Pro.
  4. Drag and drop the XML file exported from PluralEyes to the Premiere Pro project panel.